Self-styled “counter-cult” crusader Anton Hein runs websites from Amsterdam in the Netherlands that are supposedly devoted to enlightening people about groups he calls “cults.” Hein preaches his particular brand of religion and leads a so-called “house church,” though he is not an ordained minister or recognized as an authority about anything. His main website where he sells advertising is called “Apologetics Index” and he also runs several other sites related to the subject of cults and/or religion.

Hein has cultivated quite a following on Twitter, where he has thousands of followers. But what most people don’t know about Anton Hein is that he is fugitive sex offender with a felony warrant issued for his immediate arrest in the United States.

Hein was charged and convicted for “the crime of LEWD ACT UPON A CHILD.” Hein sexually abused his 13-year-old niece.

Since his conviction, despite ultimately admitting his guilt in court, Hein now claims he was somehow really innocent. In a long rambling apology at his website Hein attacks the credibility of his victim rather than admitting his own sin, which according to Christianity, is a sign of true repentance. Hein instead lists the alleged sins of his niece.

Anton Hein (Police file photo  19940

Anton Willem Hein (Sex Offender file photo 1994)

Cult News recently received the official court records regarding Anton Hein’s criminal case. These documents are now posted online, which include Hein’s Declaration (plea agreement), Criminal Minute Order, felony complaint and the final Pronouncement of Judgement.

Hein says, “The lewd act I plead guilty to is applying sperm-killing cream at the request and insistence of my niece, after she had had intercourse with a boy.” Hein states that his niece subsequently “developed a vaginal infection.” And that “at the hospital the doctor determined there were scratches.” The doctor then reported the situation. The authorities responded to the doctor’s report by arresting and prosecuting Anton Hein. Apparently the doctor, police and prosecutor didn’t believe Hein’s “sperm-killing” story.

After reviewing the documents an interesting discrepancy became evident between Anton Hein’s public statements and his criminal record. Hein says there was only one incident, which led to his criminal conviction. However, the felony complaint lists two criminal counts. The first count occurred “on and between March 14, 1994 and March 20, 1994” and the second “on and between March 20, 1994 and June 14, 1994.”

So it seems, according to the court record, Anton Hein sexually abused his niece more than once and repeatedly committed a “lewd act upon a child.” Something Hein doesn’t admit in his long apology. Instead, he says there was only one incident, which was somehow misunderstood, that led to sex charges being filed against him.

Cult News asked Anton Hein to explain this contradiction for clarification, but received no response.

It should be noted that since his felony conviction, time served and registration in California as a sex offender Hein violated the terms of his release. There is currently a felony warrant issued for his immediate arrest if he ever attempts to reenter the United States. The warrant is listed under Anton Willem Hein at the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s website.

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Children are dying of medical neglect needlessly while the Idaho State legislature dithers doing nothing to protect them.

The Idaho Statesman recently reported that five children died directly due to medical neglect because their parents belong to religious groups that don’t believe in modern medicine.

But rather than being prosecuted for manslaughter parents in Idaho are instead protected by a religious exemption.

Religious groups such as General Assembly of the First Born and Followers of Christ implicitly expect adherents to refuse medical care.

But does religious liberty preclude the right of child to live and somehow negate the responsibility of a parent to facilitate proper care? Certainly such needless deaths fit well within the realm of child abuse of the worst sort.

Parents have been charged, convicted criminally and sentenced to prison terms in other states for what apparently is considered a religious right in Idaho.

The Child Fatality Review Team annual report covered 2013 and now brings the total number of deaths to 10 since 2011 in Idaho.

All five dead children added to the list recently were infants.

Causes of death included birth-related complications and according to authorities they all could have been saved with proper medical care.

Why won’t Idaho protect helpless babies?

Well, Idaho Governor Butch Otter says that state lawmakers have agreed to at least talk about it, but so far there is no schedule even set for the promised discussion.

While the lawmakers look for an opening on their calendars children continue to suffer and die needlessly in Idaho.

Other states have removed religious exemptions regarding the medical care for minor children such as South Dakota, Oregon and Colorado.

When will Idaho act? How many more deaths will it take to convince legislators that changing the law is necessary?

Former White House director of public liaison Linda Chavez says, “As I have for the past few years, I will be emceeing an event that brings together tens of thousands of opponents of the Iranian regime…”

But does Ms. Chavez know that the “convener of the Paris conference” she will emcee is a purported “cult” leader once officially recognized by the US as a terrorist?

The event convener is Maryam Rajavi, wife of notorious “cult” leader Massoud Rajavi (rumored to be dead). The couple is known for their authoritarian control of the so-called “People’s Mujahedeen” (MEK), which was once listed by the United States State Department as a “terrorist organization.” That is, until 2012 when it was decided that the MEK be dropped from the list.

However, Mila Johns of the University of Maryland’s National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism told Wired, “The delisting of the MEK, following a well-funded political lobby campaign, creates the dangerous impression that it is possible for terrorist organizations to buy their way off the [terrorism] list.”

Maryam Rajavi

Maryam Rajavi

In a 2004 New York Times Magazine reported about the “cult-like behavior” of the MEK. Journalist Elizabeth Rubin wrote, “Every morning and night, the [MEK] kids, beginning as young as 1 and 2, had to stand before a poster of Massoud and Maryam, salute them and shout praises to them,” One former member told Rubin that the group was little more than a “husband-and-wife cult” that subjected its adherents to enforced celibacy and public confessions of sexual desires. Rubin reported that not unlike some of the most extreme cults MEK members were often extremely isolated within a compound where there was little if any access to “newspapers or radio or television” and that all devotees knew was whatever Mr. and Mrs.Rajavi “fed them.”

In a recent interview a former Rajavi follower Masoud Banisadr said that “In MEK, we were not even allowed to think of our children and their well-being.” He further explained, “You have to teach your children: instead of loving you, love the leader.” Banisadr is the author of the book Destructive and Terrorist Cults: A New Kind of Slavery.

Linda Chavez

Linda Chavez

Why would Linda Chavez want to align herself with such a notorious group? Is it possible she is clueless and doesn’t know the group’s history and how the MEK has hurt and/or horribly exploited people?

Or is Ms. Chavez simply picking up a paycheck?

Four years ago the BBC reported that “the going rate for a pro-MEK speech seems to be $20,000 (£12,500).”

How much might the purported “cult” be willing to pay for a prominent emcee to imbue its event with a patina of authority?

Is Linda Chavez cashing in on her past status as the highest-ranking woman in President Ronald Reagan’s White House? Or is she trying to look important after the embarrassment of not being confirmed as President George W. Bush pick for Secretary of Labor?

Why would someone like Ms. Chavez want to help a “husband-and-wife cult” once listed as a terrorist organization?