Eric Rudolph, once one of the ten most wanted criminals sought by the FBI, is now behind bars, reports MSNBC.

Indicted for terrorist bombings the white supremacist eluded law enforcement for years and had not been seen since 1998.

Many believed Rudolph was dead, his remains rotting in some remote and forgotten refuge.

But the FBI has confirmed that the alleged murderer is alive.

Rudolph was found by a Sheriff’s deputy in North Carolina, apparently scavenging for food in a garbage dumpster.

The suspicious officer brought in the apparent vagrant, who was later identified as a wanted fugitive.

A former member of the Missouri “Church of Israel” led by Dan Gayman, Rudolph grew up in a world filled with hatred, bigotry and paranoid conspiracy theories.

Beginning in childhood he was submerged in a subculture that includes as many as 50,000 Americans in more than a hundred desperate groups scattered across the country. This subculture is often called the “Christian Identity” movement.

Christian Identity believes that whites are the descendants of the biblical tribes of Israel and God’s elect. And also that the world will soon be engulfed in an apocalyptic struggle. In that struggle whites will battle against a worldwide Jewish conspiracy.

According to the movement’s proponents Jews and non-whites are actually descended biologically from Satan. That is, Satan had sex with Eve in the Garden of Eden and this union produced the other races.

Dan Gayman preaches a so-called “two seedline doctrine.” He says the offspring of Satan inhabit the Earth today, but rather slyly insists he doesn’t know who they are.

Gayman has a history of trying to carefully spin his beliefs, in an apparent effort to disarm critics.

Eric Rudolph’s mother introduced her son to Christian Identity.

The widowed Mrs. Rudolph eventually found a haven and home within Gayman’s Missouri compound, where the charismatic preacher became a mentor and paternal figure to her teenage son.

Within this controlled milieu Gayman nurtured Eric Rudolph’s hate and seemingly reinforced it.

It appears that the boy’s mindset was hardened at the Church of Israel. And the beliefs he largely learned there and amongst his other Identity brethren would be the impetus behind Rudolph’s “holy war” as the “Army of God.”

The FBI searching for Rudolph would later question Gayman. But like many hate group leaders, the prejudiced pastor would disavow any responsibility for the crimes committed by his one time follower.

However, Rudolph’s alleged crimes directly reflected the doctrinal focus of hatred inherent within both the Christian Identity movement and the Gayman church.

His targets for destruction would be gays, abortion clinics and the supposed “New World Order,” as expressed by nations coming together at the World Olympics.

How did Eric Rudolph survive for five years in hiding?

Did the subculture that created him sustain the fugitive?

What underground network of friends and support may have existed, that might have made Rudolph’s long-term survival in hiding possible?

Did such a support system suddenly collapse, forcing the fugitive to forage through garbage to feed himself?

The Christian Identity movement has spawned a litany of murderers and violent criminals.

How many more potential Eric Rudolphs are stewing in this sordid subculture, waiting to launch their holy wars?

As investigators unravel the past five years of Rudolph’s life, more will likely become known about this dark organized movement of hate that exists within America.

Since 9-11 Americans have looked outside of the country for the face of terror.

But long before that terrible day it was Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma bombing that made domestic terrorism the primary focus of the FBI.

Since that bombing of the Murrah Federal Building investigations and arrests have put many members of the Christian Identity movement, white supremacists, so-called “militia” men and an assortment of anti-government extremists behind bars.

The saga of Eric Rudolph offers compelling testimony that there are those within America that have a darkly twisted interpretation of religious scriptures, which often leads to bloodshed.

Osama bin Laden’s is not the only hate filled proponent of “holy war.”

The life of singer Whitney Houston has become increasingly rocky, rife with rumors of drug abuse, family estrangements and marital problems.

But now it seems to have taken an even stranger course.

Houston went to Israel and stayed with a bizarre “cult” called the “Black Hebrews.”

She referred to its members as her “brothers and sisters,” reports News 24.

Houston was supposedly “looking for inspiration for her upcoming Christmas album,” reports USA Today.

But this group of polygamists seems like a dubious source for Christmas spirit.

Ben Carter, a former Chicago resident who now calls himself “Ben Ammi Ben Israel,” leads the “cult.”

Carter claims that the “Archangel Gabriel told him that many African Americans were descendants of the lost Israeli tribe of Judah.”

He led his “lost…tribe” to Israel in 1969.

First the group lived on the dole as refugees, but later achieved resident status through the clout of the US government and no doubt due to the influence of some African American leaders.

However, the “Black Hebrews” claim of ancient Jewish heritage has never been proven or officially recognized.

Carter created an idiosyncratic religion that includes a vegetarian diet and polygamy.

Largely through the practice of polygamy the group has increased and now numbers about 2,000 in Israel, though it claims to have 30,000 members worldwide.

As Houston left Israel she waved her arm referring to the Jewish State as “my land.”

What did she mean?

Her parting statement seems eerily consistent with Carter’s teachings about Israel as the “Promised Land” of the “Black Hebrews.”

Has Whitney Houston joined a “cult”?

Her spokesperson said, “She is a spiritual woman and wanted to…touch the land and be around the saints of Dimona,” reports the Denver Post.

Accepting this “cult’s” hospitality may be the worst choice the pop singer has made since saying “I do” to bad boy Bobbie Brown.

Louis Farrakhan’s son, previously arrested for drunk driving and hit and run, is now being sued over his reckless behavior, reports Associated Press.

The elderly couple he hit while under the influence is suing the apparent bad boy from the Farrakhan brood, 44-year-old Joshua Nasir Farrakhan.

Should the Nation of Islam, which is known for reforming drunks, make a more concerted effort with the son of its founder?

Kirstie Alley is husband hunting, but her prospects seem rather limited.

The former TV star told the Washington Post while campaigning for yet another Scientology cause that she’s shopping for another husband.

The actress who plugs for Pier 1 said husband number three should be “from 40 to 60…very funny, very smart…married before…had children [and not]…a psychiatrist.”

Scientologists are virtually phobic about mental health professionals. It seems that the religion’s founder L. Ron Hubbard was a bit “crazy” and perhaps feared being locked up.

There is one glaring matrimonial requirement Alley seems to have left out though.

She didn’t mention that perhaps the most important criteria for any potential suitor is his willingness to become involved with Scientology, or at least passively resigned to its influential role in the actress’s life.

Just ask Alley’s last husband actor Parker Stevenson.

Romantic interests and spouses of celebrity Scientologists are likely to be dumped if they don’t at least take a few courses sold by the church.

Ask Lisa Marie’s Presley’s last two husbands.

Nicole Kidman might also have some insight on this subject.

Alley explained that she’s “an absolutist.”

No doubt.

There is little room for much else in the black and white world of most “cult” members.

Hate group leader Matt Hale feels the “Windy City” isn’t blowing his way, reports Associated Press.

The jailed former head of the so-called “World Church of the Creator,” now named “The Creativity Movement,” wants a coming criminal trial moved to his hometown of Peoria, where he lived with his father.

But it’s unlikely the judge will grant a change of venue. The racist’s trial is currently scheduled for September.

Hale has been on a losing streak for some time.

First, he was refused admission to the Illinois State Bar, upheld on appeal.

Then he lost the use of the name “World Church of the Creator,” which actually was originated by a group in Oregon.

It was that setback that apparently led to Hale losing it entirely.

Then it seems a federal judge became the focus of his fury. Hale is charged for plotting to murder that judge.

A Chicago jail cell is now Hale’s new home. And he may not get back to the old bedroom at Daddy’s house for a long time.

According to one psychiatrist in California “dreams do have meaning.” But what does he mean?

David Hoffman a retired psychiatrist writes a “dear doctor” column dispensing advice and answering questions through the “La Jolla Light.” One recent column was rerun within the Mammoth Times.

After recounting his personal history Hoffman eventually answers a reader’s inquiry about the meaning of dreams. He says, “Much of my life is guided and directed by [dreams].”

But the doctor’s column really raises more questions than it answers.

Hoffman discusses his “exploration into what was called ‘New Age Psychiatry,’” which might be more objectively seen as his odyssey through the world of “cults.”

The doctor admits he has studied with “Rajneesh, Shirley McLaine, Kevin Ryerson, Edgar Cayce, Ramtha, and Yogananda.”

These controversial sources are hardly what medical doctors would typically rely upon to form any clinical opinion. And it certainly is questionable that any mental health professional would base an opinion on such specious and subjective sources.

Never-the-less Hoffman concludes, “From all that, I learned to adapt the value of dreams to my own life.”

But such statements only raise more questions.

It is understood that people seeking help from a psychiatrist, clinical psychologist or professional counselor are typically at a time of personal need often also accompanied by stress, depression and/or anxiety.

This means that the patient is frequently very vulnerable and suggestible. And the helping professional occupies a position of power and influence in that person’s life during the course of their therapy/counseling.

Unfortunately, some mental health professionals may see this as an opportunity to express their personal beliefs. Perhaps even proselytizing for a certain group and/or belief system.

Thankfully this is apparently a very small minority. And exercising such an influence over a patient is most often seen as a violation of the ethical code prescribed by most State Boards and/or mental health licensing organizations.

So where then is the proper place for the practice of “New Age psychiatry”?

It seems that there would be no proper place for such a practice amongst ethical psychiatrists, who should remain objective and not project their personal beliefs into the lives of their patients.

Doctors like Hoffman may believe whatever the want, but such personal beliefs should not be passed off as part of the practice of medicine. That is, unless you are a “witch doctor.”

According to one psychiatrist in California “dreams do have meaning.” But what does he mean?

David Hoffman a retired psychiatrist writes a “dear doctor” column dispensing advice and answering questions through the “La Jolla Light.” One recent column was rerun within the Mammoth Times.

After recounting his personal history Hoffman eventually answers a reader’s inquiry about the meaning of dreams. He says, “Much of my life is guided and directed by [dreams].”

But the doctor’s column really raises more questions than it answers.

Hoffman discusses his “exploration into what was called ‘New Age Psychiatry,’” which might be more objectively seen as his odyssey through the world of “cults.”

The doctor admits he has studied with “Rajneesh, Shirley McLaine, Kevin Ryerson, Edgar Cayce, Ramtha, and Yogananda.”

These controversial sources are hardly what medical doctors would typically rely upon to form any clinical opinion. And it certainly is questionable that any mental health professional would base an opinion on such specious and subjective and sources.

Never-the-less Hoffman concludes, “From all that, I learned to adapt the value of dreams to my own life.”

But such statements only raise more questions.

It is understood that people seeking help from a psychiatrist, clinical psychologist or professional counselor are typically at a time of personal need often also accompanied by stress, depression and/or anxiety.

This means that the patient is frequently very vulnerable and suggestible. And the helping professional occupies a position of power and influence in that person’s life during the course of their therapy/counseling.

Unfortunately, some mental health professionals may see this as an opportunity to express their personal beliefs. Perhaps even proselytizing for a certain group and/or belief system.

Thankfully this is apparently a very small minority. And exercising such an influence over a patient is most often seen as a violation of the ethical code prescribed by most State Boards and/or mental health licensing organizations.

So where then is the proper place for the practice of “New Age psychiatry”?

It seems that there would be no proper place for such a practice amongst ethical psychiatrists, who should remain objective and not project their personal beliefs into the lives of their patients.

Doctors like Hoffman may believe whatever the want, but such personal beliefs should not be passed off as part of the practice of medicine. That is, unless you are a “witch doctor.”

As Madonna’s professional career continues to decline she sets her sites on new religious heights, within a group critics call a “cult.”

The fading pop icon plunked down almost $6 million dollars to buy a building in London for her spiritual guru Philip Berg, which will add to his growing chain of “Kaballah Centers,” reports The Guardian.

Madonna whose net worth is estimated at about $400 million can easily afford such largesse.

But what about helping out Berg’s virtual “slave labor” known as his “Chevra”?

These “Kaballah Center” workers make chump change serving their master and waiting upon celebrity members like the “Material girl,” when they drop in for a dose of religiosity.

In New York City Chevra pay may run about $30.00 per week and they don’t have health insurance.

Never mind. Madonna doesn’t seem to care.

However, she recently lamented that children’s books are “vapid and vacant and empty.”

But isn’t her new found religious fervor suffering from the same problem? Or is insensitivity to the plight of others a hallmark of religious learning?

The Berg centers market everything from beauty aids to supposedly energized “Kaballah water,” which the aging pop diva insists upon drinking.

Maybe it makes sense that Madonna would appreciate a religion known for its marketing. And would gravitate towards a form of “spirituality” that could cater to her ego and offer both her face and spirit a lift.

No doubt the Berg family is happy that the singer is humming their tune and will probably put a plaque somewhere on the new building to honor their benefactor.

The Church of Scientology claims it can’t get a fair trial in Pinellas County due to “community prejudice,” which they say is prevalent in that area of Florida.

This claim comes shortly before the scheduled trial for the wrongful death lawsuit against Scientology filed by the family of Lisa McPherson, who died under the church’s care some years ago in 1995.

Church lawyers have filed a motion for a change of venue, reports the St. Petersburg Times.

Before filing the motion Scientologists did a study to see just how local residents who are their neighbors perceive them.

Scientology has thousands of members and numerous facilities in the Clearwater, Florida area, which is in Pinellas County.

But apparently the neighbors who know them best in Florida consider the church a “cult” and a “scam.”

One focus group told researchers they thought the words that best describe Scientology and/or its members are “despicable, lost souls evil and mind controlling.”

The question is where can Scientology go and expect to find a potential jury pool that thinks much different?

What about an isolated Alaskan fishing village near the Arctic Circle or out in the tundra?

After all, Time Magazine once ran a cover story calling Scientology the “Cult of Greed” and describing it somewhat less flatteringly as a “global racket that survives by intimidating members and critics in a Mafia-like manner.”

Maybe the church’s legal team thinks the best “pool” to recruit a “fair” jury from is amongst celebrities lounging around the pool at one of Scientology’s “Celebrity Centers.”

Perhaps Tom Cruise or John Travolta might act as a foreman? And then they might hand pick alternates that aren’t so busy these days like Scientologists Kirstie Alley or Ann Archer?

No doubt these folks would not be considered “prejudiced” and the church would regard their verdict as “fair.”

However, the lawyer for the McPherson family seemed to summarize the situation more accurately.

He said, “They are blaming everyone but themselves for their bad public relations image.”

Richard Ofshe social psychologist and professor at the University of California at Berkeley commented about the latest sensational claims made by Scott Peterson’s defense team.

Ofshe won a Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his work exposing a drug rehab turned cult called Synanon.

But the noted scholar pronounced the theory that Laci Peterson was slain by a satanic cult, dead on arrival.

He said, “I think you’d be better off suggesting Saddam Hussein really did it,” reports ABC News.

This does seem like a more plausible theory.

Ofshe, author of Making Monsters: False Memories, Psychotherapy, and Sexual Hysteria, stated that the idea of “organized satanic cults are a complete myth.”

The most readily recognized expression of Satanism within the United States was the Church of Satan, founded by Anton LeVey.

LeVey was a provocateur and religious entrepreneur who seemed to thrive on controversy, but his church was essentially benign.

The Church of Satan had no history of murder and human sacrifice. Instead, it was for many of its adherents often a means of expressing disdain for the established norms of organized religion in America.

Stories about roving Satanists searching for blood to be spilled on their altars are now relegated to the category of urban myth.

Law enforcement authorities in California apparently know this. And they are dragging the bay rather than seriously searching for fictional cult assassins.